Diana. 17. Romania. INTJ.

I post random things, mostly about cats, fashion, mythology, and stuff from the fandoms I'm in.

Chill history lover.
Writer-wanna-be.
Socially awkward.

❝ When all you are is skin and bones, feelings are a brave thing.❞
— Herta Müller, The Hunger Angel

marthajefferson:

vintagegal:

1950s Rudolf Black tulle Cocktail Dress with rhinestone/star studded bodice and skirt  (via)

npamusic:

The Device that is keeping you alive, is also killing you.

- J.A.R.V.I.S. to Tony Stark

Mythology Meme: (2/9) Greek Gods/Goddesses ➝  Demeter


Francesco Scognamiglio S/S 2015 at MFW

Francesco Scognamiglio S/S 2015 at MFW

reallyreallyreallytrying:

me: what a lovely day! even the flowers are singing!

flowers (singing): the sins of our forefathers bind us to the dirt

A unique piece by Wallace Chan. The faces are carved using a technique he invented called the Wallace cut.

The figure is of Kore (Persephone), the goddess in charge of the Four seasons in Greek Mythology. The Wallace Cut allows the formerly singular image to be reflected in four sides.


not all those who wander are lost -j.r.r. tolkien

not all those who wander are lost -j.r.r. tolkien

inspeier:

Ended up reading the prose of Paul Celan during flight delay. This is my favorite so far: So Many Constellations 
In NYtimes review (A LOVE AFFAIR WITH SILENCE) of Collected Prose by Paul Celan, what’s said about the translator (from German > English) is equally poetic: “Her English (now her working language) has an idiomatic adroitness that catches the pauses and suspensions in Celan’s breath - his prose often seems breathed rather than thought into place.”

inspeier:

Ended up reading the prose of Paul Celan during flight delay. This is my favorite so far: So Many Constellations 

In NYtimes review (A LOVE AFFAIR WITH SILENCE) of Collected Prose by Paul Celan, what’s said about the translator (from German > English) is equally poetic: “Her English (now her working language) has an idiomatic adroitness that catches the pauses and suspensions in Celan’s breath - his prose often seems breathed rather than thought into place.”

facina-oris:

wrathofprawn:


for those not in the know, night witches were russian lady bombers who bombed the shit out of german lines in WW2. Thing is though, they had the oldest, noisiest, crappest planes in the entire world. The engines used to conk out halfway through their missions, so they had to climb out on the wings mid flight to restart the props. the planes were also so noisy that to stop germans from hearing them combing and starting up their anti aircraft guns, they’d climb up to a certain height, coast down to german positions, drop their bombs, restart their engines in midair, and get the fuck out of dodge.
their leader flew over 200 missions and was never captured.
how the fuck is this not taught in every single history class ever

facina-oris:

wrathofprawn:

for those not in the know, night witches were russian lady bombers who bombed the shit out of german lines in WW2. Thing is though, they had the oldest, noisiest, crappest planes in the entire world. The engines used to conk out halfway through their missions, so they had to climb out on the wings mid flight to restart the props. the planes were also so noisy that to stop germans from hearing them combing and starting up their anti aircraft guns, they’d climb up to a certain height, coast down to german positions, drop their bombs, restart their engines in midair, and get the fuck out of dodge.

their leader flew over 200 missions and was never captured.

how the fuck is this not taught in every single history class ever

“The world is blue at its edges and in its depths. This blue is the light that got lost. Light at the blue end of the spectrum does not travel the whole distance from the sun to us. It disperses among the molecules of the air, it scatters in water. Water is colorless, shallow water appears to be the color of whatever lies underneath it, but deep water is full of this scattered light, the purer the water the deeper the blue. The sky is blue for the same reason, but the blue at the horizon, the blue of land that seems to be dissolving into the sky, is a deeper, dreamier, melancholy blue, the blue at the farthest reaches of the places where you see for miles, the blue of distance. This light that does not touch us, does not travel the whole distance, the light that gets lost, gives us the beauty of the world, so much of which is in the color blue.”

Rebecca Solnit

This science-meets-poetry ode to the “lost light” that is Rayleigh-scattered blue comes from her book A Field Guide To Getting Lost (reviewed marvellously at Brain Pickings)

For a scientific take on why the sky is blue (except when it isn’t) check out this video.

(via theredshoes)